Math. Simplify.

Let's keep it easy, simple, and frank.

Dec 16
Another formula used when you have the vertex but not the equation. This is called the vertex form.

Another formula used when you have the vertex but not the equation. This is called the vertex form.


Explanations for the parts of the Quadratic Function, whether its for orientation, narrowness, etc.
Vertex Explanation: also explains the vertex of the quadratic function, and how to get the vertex.

Explanations for the parts of the Quadratic Function, whether its for orientation, narrowness, etc.

Vertex Explanation: also explains the vertex of the quadratic function, and how to get the vertex.


Page 2 of Quadratic function, explaining what the (c) or the constant is for.

Page 2 of Quadratic function, explaining what the (c) or the constant is for.


Quadratic Function, its parts, and the what the parts are for. Page 1.

Quadratic Function, its parts, and the what the parts are for. Page 1.


Formula for calculating compound interest

 

Where,

  • A = final amount
  • P = principal amount (initial investment)
  • r = annual nominal interest rate (as a decimal)
  • n = number of times the interest is compounded per year
  • t = number of years

_________

Example usage: An amount of $1500.00 is deposited in a bank paying an annual interest rate of 4.3%, compounded quarterly. Find the balance after 6 years.

A. Using the formula above, with P = 1500, r = 4.3/100 = 0.043, n = 4, and t = 6:

A=1500\left(1 + \frac{0.043}{4}\right)^{4 \times 6} =1938.84

So, the balance after 6 years is approximately $1,938.op.


Dec 14
Proving using identities, 30-60-90, and 45-45-90 triangles and their corresponding sides’ values.

Proving using identities, 30-60-90, and 45-45-90 triangles and their corresponding sides’ values.


Trignometric Identities

Trignometric Identities


Trigonometric Identities

Trigonometric Identities


Refresh on Trigonometry

Refresh on Trigonometry


Practice application of Compounded (normal and exponential) interest. The formula below is used for both exponential growth, decay, and continuous interest:
A = Pe^(rt)
Where
A: AmountP: Principal ( or starting amount )e: Constant ( found on your calculator )r: ratet: time 

Practice application of Compounded (normal and exponential) interest. The formula below is used for both exponential growth, decay, and continuous interest:

A = Pe^(rt)

Where

A: Amount
P: Principal ( or starting amount )
e: Constant ( found on your calculator )
r: rate
t: time